The Hero’s Fall I Fell For – Poems by Dave Oliphant

Mr. Oliphant has a special musical gift for all buyers of the book. If you order the book, please save and send Mr. Oliphant a copy of your electronic receipt with a copy of your physical mailing address via email and he will mail it to you. You can reach him here: dave_oliphant AT yahoo DOT com

(Note: You can preview several of the poems below.)


Excerpts from Five Versions of the 12th Street Rag (1967)

Duke Ellington, “Twelfth Street Rag” (Decca, The Original Decca Recordings: Early Ellington), recorded January 14, 1931 (2:58)

Fats Waller and His Rhythm, “Twelfth Street Rag” (Pickwick International Records, Ain’t Misbehaving), recorded June 24, 1935 (2:45)

Count Baise, “Twelfth Street Rag” (Jazz Roots, Jumpin’ at the Woodside), recorded Aril 5, 1939 (3:o8)


From Jazz God and Freshman English (1973)

Dizzy Gillespie, “A Night in Tunisia” (The RCA Victor Encyclopedia of Recorded Jazz, Album 5: Gil to Hig) recorded February 22, 1945 with Don Byas on tenor saxophone (3:08)


Denton (1994)

Euel Box Quintet, “Toddlin'” (Columbia Transcriptions, North Texas State College Jazz Concert), recorded 1957 (3:12)

Shorty Rogers and His Giants, “Planetarium” (Atlantic, Martians Come Back!), recorded March 26, 1955, with Texan Jimmy Giuffre on tenor sax (3:39)


Three Musicians Perform their Freedom (2003)

Charles Mingus, “Ysabel’s Table Dance” (RCA, Tijuana Moods), recorded July 16, 1958 (11:35)


Jazz by the Boulevard (2013)

David “Fathead” Newman, “Hard Times” (Collectibles, Fathead), released in 1958 with Ray Charles on piano (4:43)


The Jazz on the Tube interview with Dave Oliphant

Click here to listen to the interview with Dave Oliphant

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Interview with Dave Oliphant about Texan Jazz

Interview with Dave Oliphant


Download the mp3 here

The music at the end this interview is “I’m an Old Cow Hand” composed by Johnny Mercer and recorded by Fairfield,Texas-born (1924) Kenny Durham on January 10, 1960. For a unique “discography” of Durham’s work, see Oliphant’s biography-poem KD: A Jazz Biography


Books by Dave Oliphant

Book: Texan Jazz


Book: Jazz Mavericks of the Lone State State


Book: KD: A Jazz Biography


Documentary about Dave Oliphant by Kanya Lyons

A documentary short about Native Texas Poet Dave Oliphant. This documentary was filmed, edited, produced and directed by Kanya Lyons in 2018.

Oliphant was born in Fort Worth in 1939. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees in English from Lamar University and the University of Texas, respectively, and his Ph.D. from Northern Illinois University. His primary reading and writing interest has always been poetry, but he has also written four books on jazz (primarily by Texas musicians).

He has translated poetry from Spanish and was a winner of the Texas Institute of Letters book translation award in 2011. In addition to fourteen collections of his own poetry, among them The Pilgrimage: Selected Poems 1962-2012, he has edited three anthologies of Texas poetry and one of Chilean poetry. For forty years he contributed essays on and reviews of Texas poetry to various state literary magazines, and 55 of those pieces were collected in 2015 in his Generations of Texas Poets.

He retired from the University of Texas at Austin after serving for 30 years in various capacities, from assistant professor to editor of a scholarly journal, senior lecturer, and coordinator of the Freshman Seminars Program. He lives in Cedar Park, Texas with his wife and muse, Maria.


Click hear to listen to Dave Oliphant reading his poetry


– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

Music credits:

The Jazz on the Tube podcast theme song is “Mambo Inferno” performed by The Manhattan School of Music Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra conducted by Bobby Sanabria from the CD ¡Que Viva Harlem!

At the end of today’s interview, we featured “I’m an Old Cow Hand”, written by Johnny Mercer and performed by Kenny Dorham (Xanadu Records, The Kenny Dorham Memorial Album) recorded January 10, 1960 (4:12)

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Ornette’s boyhood career


Download the mp3 here

Within months of picking up the saxophone, Ornette was a working musicians in some of the scariest dives in Fort Worth, bringing home much needed money for his family whose father, a baseball player and singer, died when Ornette was seven.

We talk about this and other topics and read from A.B. Spellman’s classic: “Four Lives in the Bebop Business”

Erratum:  Spellman refers to Melvin Lastie as “Melvin Lassister, a clarinetist.” It’s possible Melvin also played the clarinet, but he was most known for his trumpet playing.

The Lastie clan is one of the great New Orleans musical families and includes Herman Riley and the Andrews clan (James, Troy and Glenn) in their extended family. Frank Lastie introduced gospel drums to the Spiritual Church. and played with Louis Armstrong in the Waif’s Home Band. The family was very important in the Spiritual Church.

Others episodes from “Ornette: Deep from the Heart of Texas” here:

Part One: Ornette: Deep from the Heart of Texas – Conversation with Dave Oliphant

Part Two: Ornette in Amarillo

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Ornette in Amarillo


Download the mp3 here

We’re following up on our special program “Ornette: Deep from the Heart of Texas” with Dave Oliphant

We go even further down this fascinating rabbit hole.

When Ornette was 19 (1949), he had an extended gig in Amarillo, Texas where he regularly jammed “after hours” with a legendary avant-garde hillbilly steel guitar player.

The history of American music is richer and more surprising than we can imagine!

NOTE: There were THREE Billy Briggs in Texas: a fiddle player, a saxophonist, and the artist in question.

You can get Michael H. Price’s fascinating book “Thick Lights, Loud Smoke, and Dim, Dim Music” here:

Note: It was a performance of this tune by a visiting jazz band performing in the auditorium of I.M. Terrell High School in Fort Worth that Ornette says inspired him with the idea of playing the saxophone (c. 1943)

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

 

Topsy – The history of jazz in one tune

Count Basie and his orchestra, recorded in NYC August 9, 1937.

Written and arranged by Eddie Durham, one of the most important and underappreciated artists in jazz and American music history.

Irish, Mexican and Afro-American on his father’s side and Native American on his mother’s, in his childhood Durham grew up wearing his hair long and braided, Native American-style.

Born and raised in rural San Marcos, Texas (1906), he learned to ride, drive cattle, shoot and hunt rattlesnakes. He was also a fine carpenter.

One of the legendary Oklahoma City Blue Devils, he was a mainstay of the Count Basie band.

A first rate composer and arranger, he wrote for Artie Shaw and Glenn Miller and is reputed to have been the key arranger on “In the Mood”, the anthem of the Big Band Swing era.

As if that weren’t enough, Durham was the pioneer of the jazz electric guitar (Charlie Christian quoted him in his early recordings). Durham was also a virtuosic trombone player who invented the Non-Pressure technique for the trombone.

Here he is at age 73 (born 1906). This was filmed in 1979.

Serious guitar players know that Django Rheinhardt wasn’t the only inspiration for today’s guitar-based “Gypsy Jazz” movement.

Here’s some folks from around the world honoring Durham’s art with their own versions of “Topsy.”

Arranged by Alexander Vinitsky (Russia)

From the Netherlands

Henk Sprenger guitar, Gideon Tazelaar (13) baritone sax, Stefan Bos (15) piano, , playing Topsy by Eddie Durham.

Recorded 30 July in Hilversum Netherlands

Way Down Yonder in New Orleans (1938) – both takes

Recorded in New York City, NY September 27, 1938. Eddie Durham takes a solo – on electric guitar – in this jewel-like ensemble piece with Lester Young (tenor sax, clarinet) Buck Clayton (trumpet) Eddie Durham (guitar) Freddie Green (guitar) Walter Page (bass) Jo Jones (drums)

Listen to the intro. You’ll hear the riff that became “In the Mood.”

A long interview with Eddie Durham by Stanley and Helen Dance (The audio quality is terrible and it’s unedited, but contains a lot of gems.)

https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/52035/#playback/M4A-1

Click here for the Dave Oliphant bio of Eddie Durham

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.