Roberto Carcassés Jazz Quartet ft. Bobby Carcassés

Roberto Carcassés Jazz Quartet at Terraza 7 on Friday, March 20th, 2020 at 8:00 pm.

$15 cover charge for mezzanine.
$10 Suggested donation for the first floor.

FREE admission for CHILDREN 12 and under, with an adult over 21.

Featuring:

Roberto Carcassés / Piano.
Bobby Carcassés / Trumpet.
Alvaro Benavides / Bass.
Robby Ameen / Drums.

As the son of Afrojazz pioneer Bobby Carcassés, he might have made a decent living by keeping his head down and following in those famous footsteps. But Roberto, sometimes known by the diminutive “Robertico,” pursued a musical path all his own and now he’s on his way to becoming a legend in his own right, a standard-bearer for a young generation taking Cuban music to new heights.

Roberto Julio Carcassés Colón was born in 1972 in Havana’s Playa district and today he lives in Marianao, not far from the Tropicana where his father used to perform five decades ago.

Bobby Carcassés, now 81 years old, has always liked to play anything he could get his hands on – congas, bass, flugelhorn, trumpet, saxophone – in addition to singing. His son, from an early age, leaned towards piano.

Roberto studied percussion at the Escuela Nacional de Arte. He says “I’m in love with the piano, but that doesn’t mean I don’t think like a percussionist. I think a lot about rhythm. For me rhythm is the most important thing. Not rhythm as a genre of music, but as a way of life.”

He also sings but says, “the voice takes time to educate and I’m still in the process of learning.”

Bobby and Roberto have played with renowned musicians such as Chucho Valdés, Wynton Marsalis, George Benson and more. Both are bandleaders, Roberto of the seminal Timba Funk band Interactivo collective, which has featured great international artists like Cimafunk, Melvis Santa and Telmary Díaz, among others.

Roberto Carcasses Jazz Quartet features his father as a very special guest.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

Peruchín!

Pedro Nolasco Jústiz Rodríguez, better known as Peruchín (January 31, 1913 – December 24, 1977)

We don’t seem to have any video of him so we’ll have to content ourselves with these three cuts.

Pa Gozar, La Mulata Rumbera, Redención


Note: On “La Mulata Rumbera”: Con Pedro Peruchín Jústiz, Orlando Cachaito López, Guillermo Barreto, Gustavo Tamayo, Yeyito Iglesias, Tata Güines

Some of the pianist influenced by Peruchín include Charlie Palmieri, George Shearing, Eddie Palmieri, Papo Lucca, Chucho Valdés and Alfredo “Sabor” Linares. Famed pianist Bebo Valdés was his disciple.

He was the greatest pianist in Cuban music, and there were some very good pianists around in those days: Lilí Martínez, Jesús López, Lino Frías. But what Peruchín could do in one phrase was without equal. And what he did harmonically, rhythmically, was so modern. He was 30, 40 years ahead of his time. Every important Latin pianist I know … has copied or been influenced by him.
– Paquito Hechavarría, 1995

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

Cuba on the keyboard


Roberto Carlos Valdes

Cuban piano is combination of the precision of the classical keyboard with the precision of the tumbadora.

Eighty eight drums, ten fingers.

Roberto Carlos Valdes, grandson of Bebo Valdes.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

Daymé!

A beautiful singer, a beautiful band, and beautiful footage of the beautiful people of Cuba.

The tune is “La Rumba Me Llamo Yo”

The singer and leader is Daymé Arocena, one of the great artists of the new generation of Cuba.

A comment from a YouTube viewer:

“I’m not Cuban or have any Hispanic descendant but I watched her on tiny desk here on YouTube and ever since I’ve been listening to her music. I don’t even understand half of what she’s singing about. Her voice is just so powerful and magnetic.”

That’s the magic of the music.

A little about Daymé:

Born and raised in Havana, her conservatoire training was combined with an upbringing grounded in Cuba’s own musical foundations. Accepted age 9 into one of the country’s prestigious music schools, she studied a choir directing course rooted in Western classical tradition. Meanwhile, she grew up with the day-to-day schooling in folkloric music that’s common to most Cuban households. At regular, intimate get-togethers, celebrating the island’s Santería religion, dancing and singing are the gatherings’ mainstays – a combination that’s meant she sees its deep-rooted traditions in a wider musical context.

Winning the prestigious Marti y el Arte award in 2007, her talent was spotted at a young age. Becoming principal singer with big band Los Primos at age 14, nods of approval followed from Wynton Marsalis, the Lincoln Centre’s teacher and trumpet player, and much-lauded saxophonist Jane Bunnett

Click here for more about Daymé and her music.


Great news!

You can now watch this video – and all Spanish language videos – with English subtitles. It’s free!

Click here for instructions on how to turn on English subtitles.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

The kids from ENA

ENA is Cuba’s secondary school conservatory.

Thanks to the dedication of Camilo Moriera, a new generation of Cuban musicians is being introduced to jazz.

The tune arranged and conducted by Camilo is a Cuban classic “Son de la Loma.” It translates “They’re from the hills”

Makes me homesick.

We’ve featured Camilo’s work on these pages.

Camilo’s Jazz on the Tube sponsored trip to New York City
jazzonthetube.com/camilo-moreira-in-the-bronx/

Jazz on the Tube visits Camilo in Havana
jazzonthetube.com/visiting-with-camilo/

Camilo Moreira -Jazz Educator in Havana
jazzonthetube.com/camilo-moreira-jazz-educator-havana/

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

Nosotros La Musica

Made in 1964 and loosely translates to “We Are the Music”

Written and directed by Rogelio Paris (1936-2016)

This film was his first major project and he made it when only 28.

Paris worked as a documentary maker at the Cuban Film Institute (ICAIC) and was also a permanent professor of Filmmaking at the Faculty of Cinema, Radio and Television of the Institute of Higher Art

This single film could be the basis of an entire University course in Cuban music.

A rare panorama of Cuban music and dance from the 1960s. Featuring legendary Cuban musicians as well as vibrant spontaneous performances, We Are the Music captures the mood and vitality of Havana during a golden period.

Note: If you’re a jazz hound and nothing else will do for you, fast forward to 22:00.


Great news!

You can now watch this video – and all Spanish language videos – with English subtitles. It’s free!

Click here for instructions on how to turn on English subtitles.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details