David Amram on the David Letterman show (1984)

The year was 1984.

David Letterman had an audience in the millions and he invited David Amram on to demonstrate the instruments in his collection.,

This might be the biggest group of people ever to get a lesson in world music.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

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Jerry Gonzales, Plena and Puerto Rican history

Jerry Gonzales, the great congero, trumpet player, and band leader.

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We received these marvelous memories of Jerry from subscribers:

I remember a Fort Apache gig in NY at Sweet Basil. I was sitting right up front with my 9-year-old son. A group of young guys came and sat behind us—four of them—I think they were Cubans. They looked at Jerry’s set of five congas and started snickering… five congas? Nobody plays five congas, who is he kidding? And on, and on. Well, by the end of the set, they were whistling, clapping, and shouting the praises of Jerry. They became complete converts and had joined the church of the “Fort Apache Band” with the reverend Jerry González presiding!

– Yves Nazon
Born: Haïti, July 04, 1954


Jerry and Andy González, while with Conjunto Libre, played at my old Café Galería y Teatro – La Tertulia in the East Village, NYC in the late ’70s! Jerry was a consistent innovator, jovial, and a perfectionist when it came to his music! He respected those who respected good music. His live recording with Chano Dominguez, Rumba Pà Jerry, is evidence of how a master conguero transforms a simple tune into a great one! He also displays his ability to teach new musicians how to elaborate on a simple rhythm pattern without losing the original sound. I will always remember him doing what he did best!

– Raùl Cordova
Born: Puerto Rico, May 11, 1947


For a big chunk of time, I was their documentarian, photographer, and friend.

– Tontxi Vazquez
Born: New York City

More memories music here: https://www.jazzonthetube.com/memories/

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Cuba Insight – Join the list

Cuba is not just another country with music.

It’s nothing less than the Mother Ship of Afro-Latin music.

With its habanera, danzon, changüí, son, son montuno, rumba, mambo, cha-cha-cha, timba, and wide variety of Afro-Cuban spiritual musical forms, Cuba has been as important to the music of the world as the United States has been with its blues, jazz, rock and rock, and gospel music.

But getting information about the Cuban jazz scene is not easy…

It’s scarcely covered by major jazz magazines. Even getting a list of jazz venues in Havana isn’t easy.

Ken’s Cuba List is filling the gap with videos and articles that will help you put Cuba’s music in perspective and educate yourself about its riches past and present.

We’re also sharing practical information including travel tips and a weekly listing of what’s going on in the clubs in Havana (the only source of this particular info on the Internet.)

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
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Chucho Valdés y Su Combo ft. Amado Borcelá “Guapachá” (1964)

Personnel:

Amado Borcelá “Guapachá” (Voz)
Chucho Valdés (Piano y Director Musical)
Carlos Emilio Morales (Guitarra Eléctrica)
Orlando Lopez “Cachaito” (Bajo)
Julio Vento (Flauta)
Papita Ampudia (Pailas)
Cala (Bongos)

Jazz on the Tube Interview with a Havana musician who lived in this scene

Note: A “milliner” is a hat-maker, not a millionaire.

Gilberto Valdés Zequeira was born in Havana on August 16, 1928.

As a kid, he listened to Chano Pozo’s rehearsals in the Colon neighborhood of Havana.

His vocal group had a weekly gig at the San Souci nightclub in Havana and he appeared on Cuba’s pioneering television channel twice a week in the 1950s.

Roy Haynes introduced him to American jazz drumming and gave him his first set of drumsticks.

He performed with his old friend Bebo Valdés when the two of them found themselves in Europe in the early 1960s.

He spent time as the #2 man at Egrem.

He was Dizzy Gillespie’s host when Dizzy visited Havana in 1977.

He introduced Irakere to Columbia Records and toured the world with them as their manager.

He helped save Cuba’s most important jazz club La Zorra y el Cuervo from being turned into a pizzeria.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg of Gilberto’s remarkable life.

Click here to learn more about Gilberto.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

The African Influence in Cuba

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Machito, the Legend

Things are good, just very intense and insanely busy.

I hope things will settle down by September.

But hey, the show must go on, even if intermittently.

There are TWO clips here. Make sure you look at both.

The first clip is the English language section of an excellent documentary on Machito.

The second clip is the entire documentary.

The entire video

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

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