Remembering Andy Gonzalez

A tribute to the influential Latin bassist

Bassist Andy Gonzalez passed away on April 9, 2020 at the age of 69 from pneumonia and complications of diabetes.

Gonzalez was born January 1, 1951 in Manhattan, New York; his father Geraldo was a singer in salsa bands and his older brother Jerry Gonzalez (born 18 months before Andy) became a notable trumpeter and percussionist.

After a brief stint on violin in school, Andy Gonzalez switched permanently to bass, having early associations with the bands of Ray Barretto and Eddie Palmieri.

In 1974 he co-founded Conjunto Libre with the timbales player Manny Oquendo, mixing together salsa and jazz; he was the band’s musical director for 35 years, recording a dozen albums.

In the early 1980s, Andy and Jerry Gonzalez formed the Fort Apache Band, an influential and innovative group that invigorated Afro-Cuban jazz by infusing it with modern jazz and r&b, switching spontaneously between the idioms, all of it propelled by Andy’s bass.

A prolific and versatile musician, Gonzalez was on more than 700 sessions through the years including with Dizzy Gillespie, Tito Puente,

Hilton Ruiz, Houston Person, Machito, Steve Turre, Don Byron and both Chico and Arturo O’Farrill.

Health problems forced him out of action for a time in 2004 but he made a comeback and one of his last sessions was his long overdue recording debut as a leader in 2016 (Entre Colegas).

Here is Andy Gonzalez from the Entre Eolegas sessions, performing “Misty” with a group also including trumpeter Carlos Abadie, singer Manuel Alejandro Carro, guitarist Ben Lapidus, and a full percussion section.

If you want to learn more about Andy click here.

-Scott Yanow

The NYU Jazz Orchestra conducted by Bobby Sanabria

DECEMBER 4, 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NYU ALL UNIVERSITY JAZZ ORCHESTRA conducted by Bobby Sanabria

CELEBRATES THE HOLIDAY SEASON WITH A LATIN JAZZ SPECTACULAR!!!

WORKS BY LEONARD BERNSTEIN, TITO PUENTE, EDDIE PALMIERI, ARSENIO RODRIGUEZ, JOAO DONATO, AND MORE AS WELL AS HOLIDAY CLASSICS PERFOMED IN A LATIN JAZZ WAY!

Multi-Grammy nominated NYU faculty member Bobby Sanabria will be conducting the NYU All University Jazz orchestra in a special Latin Jazz concert in celebration of the holiday season on December 10, 2019 at NYU’s Steinhart Hall.

“It’s been an exciting, fruitful semester here in my new position at NYU as the students of the All University Jazz Orchestra represent the full gamut of the diverse educational opportunities NYU has to offer. Students from the various departments, Jazz, Music Ed, and more, are part of this talented group and the concert will prove to be not only entertaining for the audience but will also be a showcase for these talented young artists who represent the future of the music as well as NYU’s commitment to cultural diversity.” – Bobby Sanabria

Under Maestro Sanabria’s baton the orchestra will be performing works by masters like LEONARD BERNSTEIN (One Hand, One Heart from West Side Story), TITO PUENTE (Elegua Changó, Mambo Diablo), EDDIE PALMIERI (Mi Congo), JOAO DONATO (Amazonas), ARSENIO RODRIGUEZ (La Vida Es Un Sueño) and more as well, as well as Christmas classic like Winter Wonderland, Carol of the Bells, and Jingle Bells all adapted to Afro-Latin rhythms!

The concert is FREE and open to the public and will occur on…

DECEMBER 10, 2019 at NYU at STEINHARDT HALL at 35 West 4th St. NYC AT 8PM

Fo further information or to contact Maestro Sanabria for press interviews you may contact…

DR. ELISE SOBOL at 212.998.5778 or es86@nyu.com or NOREEN GOLDBERG at 212.998.5539 or noreen.golberg@nyu.edu

BOBBY SANABRIA SHORT BIO

Bobby Sanabria is an eight time Grammy-nominee as a leader. Known as a drummer, percussionist, composer, arranger, conductor, documentary film producer, educator, activist, and bandleader, his versatility as both a drummer and percussionist, from small group to big band, has become legendary. A native son of the South Bronx born to Puerto Rican parents, he has performed and recorded with every major figure in the world of Latin jazz and salsa from Mario Bauzá, Tito Puente, Mongo Santamaría, Dizzy Gillespie, Chico O’Farrill, Ray Barretto, Cándido, to Larry Harlow, Ruben Blades, Celia Cruz, and jazz luminaries as diverse as Henry Threadgill, Charles McPherson, Randy Brecker, Joe Chambers, Jean Lucien, The Mills Brothers, and others. DRUM! Magazine named him Percussionist of the Year (2005); he was named Percussionist of the Year by the Jazz Journalists Association in 2011 and 2013. In 2006, he was inducted into the Bronx Walk of Fame. He was a recipient of the 2018 Jazz Education Network (JEN) LeJENS of Jazz Lifetime Achievement Award for his work as a musician and educator. In 2008 Congressman Dennis Kucinich honored his work as a musician and educator by reading his name into the Congressional Record and in 2018 the U.S. Congressional Black Caucus honored him as a musician, educator. Every single one of his big band recordings, seven in total, have been nominated for Grammys. His 2018 recording, ‘West Side Story Reimagined,’ reached #1 on the national Jazz Week radio charts, was nominated for a 2018 Grammy, and won the prestigious 2019 Record of The Year Award from the Jazz Journalists Association. Partial proceeds from sales of the recording go to the Jazz Foundation of America’s Puerto Rico Relief Fund for musicians. He is the Co-Artistic Director of the Bronx Music Heritage Center and the forthcoming Bronx Music Hall. His lifetime dedication to spreading the history, culture, of jazz and Latin jazz to the general public as a performer, as well as educating a new generation of players, composers, arrangers, has no parallel. A member of Max Roach’s legendary M’BOOM percussion ensemble, he is on the faculty of the New School and NYU. He is also the on air host of the Latin Jazz Cruise on WBGO FM.

NYU ALL UNIVERSITY JAZZ ORCHESTRA conducted by Bobby Sanabria – photo by Michael Abramyan

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

Tito can dance!

In case you ever wondered, Tito Puente can dance!

Tito at the at Latin NY Music Awards at the Beacon Theater in the 1970s.

The video is a little rough in places and the audio gets very low half way through, but the dancing just gets better!

And the music is smoking hot.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

The making of “Cortijo and His Time Machine” – Harvey Averne


Download the mp3 here

Produced by Coco Records in 1974

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

Bobby Carcasses – La Noche d’Ayer

My understanding is that this is Bobby’s first full scale production music video.

From an email I received from Bobby in response to a question about his music education in Cuba

“I never studied in any school of music.

All my education comes from other lives that I was living before.

Chucho and Emiliano gave me many tricks.

Arturo Sandoval plunged me deep into the world of the flugelhorn (trumpet too).

Armando Sequeira Romeu: double bass, drums, more chords on piano, and many standards like “Autumn in NY”, “Lullaby of Birdland” and many other tunes, but the more important to be inside in swing.

Pacolo, Tata Gúines and Changuito taught me about congas and the whole of percussion.

In the Musical Theater, Leo Brower and Tony Taño taught me about arranging, orchestration and many things about writing for symphonic formats, etc.”

Quite an education!


Great news!

You can now watch this video – and all Spanish language videos – with English subtitles. It’s free!

Click here for instructions on how to turn on English subtitles.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

The making of Machito’s “Fireworks” – Harvey Averne

Nominated for the 1977 Grammy Award


Music featured in this program

00:00 Macho (First Movement)
10:50 Soy Salsero
21:04 Mi Rito Llego
28:28 Despierta Boricua
36:22 Macho (Second Movement)


Liner Notes

Side A

Mi Ritmo Llego * (Guaguanco/4:55
(My Rhythm is Here)
(Ubaldo “Lalo” Rodriequez) (Coco Mus./BMI)
(Arr: Ray Santos)

Desilusion * (Bolero/3:45
(I’m Disillusioned)
(Ubaldo “Lalo” Rodriequez) (Coco Mus./BMI)
(Arr: Ray Santos)

Despierta Boricua ** (Son Montuno/4:15
(Wake up Puerto Rican)
(Frank “Machito” Grillo)) (Coco Mus./BMI)
(Arr: Lito Pena)

Guaguanco a Mexico * (Guaguanco/4:17
(Guaguanco for Mexico)
(Ubaldo “Lalo” Rodriequez) (Coco Mus./BMI)
(Arr: Elias Lopez)

No Seras Para Mi * (Bolero/3:29
(You’ll Never Be FOR Me)
(Grecia Domenech) (R.R.)
(Arr: Jorge Millet)

Side B

Macho ** (Instrumental) (Descarga)/13:00
(My Rhythm is Here)
(Jorge Millet) (Coco Mus./BMI)
(Arr: Jorge Millet)

Soy Salsero ** (Son Montuno)/7:00
(I Sing Salsa)
(Frank “Machito” Grillo)) (Coco Mus./BMI)
(Arr: Jorge Millet)

PRODUCED BY HARVEY LAVERNE

Organ and Acoustical Piano Solo “Macho” / Charlie Palmieri
Piccolo Trumpet Solo “Macho” / Lew Soloff
Timbales Solo “Macho” / Nicky Marrero
Electric Piano “Macho” / Jorge Millet
Alto Sax Solo “Macho” / Bobby Porcelli
Electric Guitar “Macho” / Harry Vigiani
Bata Drums “Macho” / Julito Collazo, Angel “Cachete” Maldonado, Hector “Flaco” Hernandez
Trumpet Solo “Soy Salsero” / Victor Paz
Trombone Solo “Mi Ritmo Llego” / Barry Roger

Recording Studio / Plaza Sound
Recording Engineer / Rob Freeman
Overdub Engineer / Don Hunerberg
Mixed at / Blank Tapes
Mixed by / Harvey Averne
Mix Engineer / Bob Blank
Mastering / Jose Rodriguez
Photography and Album Design / Hal Wilson

1st Session *

Leader / Frank “Machito” Grillo
Director – Percussion / Mario Grillo
Vocals / Lalo Rodriguez
Conductor / Jorge Millet
Piano / Ray Coen
Trumpets / Paul Cohen, John Faddis, Tony Cofresi, Wyman Reed
Trombones / Barry Rogers, Leo Pineda
Alto Saxophone / Lennie Hambro
Tenor Saxophones / Mario Rivera, Jose Madera
Baritone Saxophone / Leslie Jonakins
Bass / Jose Santiago
Maracas / Ismael Quintana
Bongos / Tommy “Chuckie” Lopez
Conga / Johnny “Dandy” Rodriguez
Timbales / Nicky Marrero
Coro / Machito, Adalberto Santiago, Ismael Quintana, Chivirico Davila

2nd Session **

Leader / Vocals / Frank “Machito” Grillo
Director – Percussion / Mario Grillo
Conductor / Jorge Millet
Piano / Charlie Palmieri
Trumpets / Victor Paz, Lew Soloff, Tony Cofresi, Charlie Camilleri
Trombones / Barry Rogers, Sam Burtis
Alto Saxophone / Bobby Porcelli
Tenor Saxophones / Lou Orenstein, Mauricio Smith
Baritone Saxophone / Mario Rivera
Bass / Andy Gonzalez
Maracas / Ismael Quintana
Bongos / Tommy “Chuckie” Lopez
Conga / Johnny “Dandy” Rodriguez
Timbales / Nicky Marrero
Coro / Lalo Rodriguez, Ismael Quintana, Victor Velazquez

Special thanks to Victor Paz, Jorge Millet, Mario Grillo, Doug Jones


Translation of “Macho” – First Movement

The singer is Machito.

Machito and the musicians, especially the bata drummers, are evoking the Orisha.

“ ‘Boru ‘buya,” a contraction of the Yorùbá-Cuban greeting “ìbo rú di (ì)’bo ye,” routinely bestowed upon high priests, or babalawo in Cuba. The phrase’s literal meaning is: “The sacrifice that is carried becomes the sacrifice that is suitable.” (Source: “Machito and His Afro-Cubans: Selected Transcriptions”)

“Ashe. Mucho ashe.” – Creative force. Much creative force.

“Suerte y salud para todos mis hermanos.” – Luck and health to all my brothers.

Elegua – Orisha of beginning, of crossroads, of doorways, of fate

Babalu Aye (San Lazaro) – Orisha of the healing spirit, protector of the weak and the ill

Yemaya – Orisha of the Ocean’s surface, of love, fertility and family

Shango – Orisha of thunder, drumming, dancing, fire and male virility

Oshun – Orisha of beauty and sexuality

Obatala – Sky Father and creator of Orishas and human beings, rules all



Great news!

You can now watch this video – and all Spanish language videos – with English subtitles. It’s free!

Click here for instructions on how to turn on English subtitles.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details