Tito Puente and Charlie Palmieri en El Bronx

The music and narration tell the whole story.

What else can I add?

The only thing I can add is the location.

The playground of PS 130, Hewitt Place, Bronx.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

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Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
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Jerry Gonzalez (1949-2018)

Jerry Gonzalez (1949-2018)

Andy Gonzalez & Rumbajazz with Jerry Gonzalez, Pedrito Martinez, Perdomo, and Ivan Renta in Puerto Rico Heineken Jazz Fest 2008.

One of the great musicians of his generation Jerry Gonzalez passed away in accident in Spain. More information coming as we get it.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Click here: The emergency in Puerto Rico is not over: How to help

West Side Story Reimagined (NPR)

West Side Story Reimagined (NPR)

Maria Hinojosa talks with Bobby Sanabria about “West Side Story Reimagined.”

This is our fourth article about this piece.

We did one before the premier.

One before the free streaming performance at Dizzy’s in New York City.

One before the release of the CD and the free outdoor show at Lincoln Center’s Damrosch Park.

Why so much attention?

Because it’s going to be one of the cultural forces of the year, if not the decade.

And remember, you heard about it on Jazz on the Tube first.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Click here: The emergency in Puerto Rico is not over: How to help

Documentary – “Mr. Bongo: I’m going to live until I die”

Jack Costanzo (1919-2018)

Jack Costanzo started out as a dancer but self-education which included three trips to Havana in the 1940s made him a bongero (bongo master) and he was in instant demand both with jazz and Latin orchestras.

His first exposure to the instrument came when he was 14 years old at a ballroom dance concert in his home town of Chicago.

Costanzo probably did more to introduce the bongos to North American music than any other single artist.

Here’s a short list of some of the artists he collaborated with over the years:

Charlie Parker, Dizzie Gillespie, Ella Fitzgerald, Fats Navarro, Frank Sinatra, Desi Arnaz, Rene Touzet, Stan Kenton, Nat King Cole, Peggy Lee, Danny Kaye, Perez Prado, Charlie Barnet, Pete Rugolo, Betty Grable, Harry James, Judy Garland, Patti Page, Jane Powell, Ray Anthony, Martin & Lewis, Frances Faye, Dinah Shore, Xavier Cugat, Tony Curtis and Eddie Fisher.

Some excerpts from an excellent article on Costanzo by George Varga that appeared in the San Diego Union-Tribune:

“I had to learn on my own, which is good, because I developed my own style. It seemed like it came natural. I listened to a lot of music. (Noted Spanish bandleader) Xavier Cugat was big. And, many years later, he hired me.”

“(An) aneurysm did not keep the tireless “Mr. Bongo” from headlining concerts periodically until as recently as late 2015. Nor did it deter him from practicing his drumming at home, nearly every day, until just a few weeks ago.

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

Meet Mamboso.net

Photo by Francisco Molina Reyes II of Mamboso.net

Salsa Meets Jazz at the Village Gate…

One of the great shining episodes of American music history came to an abrupt end in 1993 when the Village Gate could not maintain in the ferocious Manhattan real estate market (such is the fate of so many creative venues in NYC.) . 

When exactly it started is hard to say, but in the early 60s “Symphony Sid” Torin and Jack Hooke teamed up with Art D’Lugoff’s The Village Gate for a series called “Monday Nights at the Gate” that presented straight Latin music performances.

Then in 1965 the Tico All Stars made the scene  at the Gate producing one of the greatest Latin jam sessions every recorded – and the rest, as they say, is history. With this crew, how could it fail? Israel Cachao Lopez, Ray Barretto, Johnny Pacheco, Cándido Camero, Joe Cuba, Jose “Cheo” Feliciano, and the Palmieri brothers (Charlie and Eddie.) 

Finding good info about this important but little documented series has been tricky.

Then in a recent conversation with Bobby Sanabria I discovered the marvelous web archive work of artist and photoprapher Francisco Molina Reyes II. 

You want photos? 

He’s got photos.

You want the history?

He’s got the history.

You want music?

He’s got MUSIC!

Enjoy!

What? You haven’t clicked yet?

How about these greats together live?

Eddie Palmieri, Monto Santamaria, Tito Puente, Mario Bauza,  Paquito D’Rivera, Gracila, Ray Mantilla, Ray Barretto, James Moody, Roy Ayers, Bobby Sanabria, Hilton Ruiz, Daniel Ponce, Patato Valdes, Chico O’Farrill, Dave Valentin, Johnny Pacheo, and more. 

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Click here: The emergency in Puerto Rico is not over: How to help

West Side Story Reimagined

West Side Story Reimagined

Composed by Leonard Bernstein for Broadway 60 years ago, West Side Story has proven to be one of the 20th century’s most durable musical creations.

This March 17, 2018, Bobby Sanabria’s Multiverse, made up of some of the finest musicians working in New York City today, will be performing a “reimagined” version of the work’s timeless melodies using the rhythms of Puerto Rico, Brazil, Venezuela, the Dominican Repubic and other Latin American countries.

Sanabria explains. In the reimagined version…

“…Puerto Rican bomba xicá, yuba and plena are omnipresent. Dominican merengue, Venezuelan joropo, Brazilian bossa nova and samba, funk, New Orleans second line, Cuban bolero and son montuno are now included alongside the show’s original use of Mexican huapango, Cuban mambo, cha-cha-cha, jazz, swing, European waltz and orchestral music.

It represents in full force the rainbow that is our collective Latino and African American culture in New York.”

Details:

https://www.hostos.cuny.edu/culturearts/events/YEAR-2018/MAR/West-side-story/West-side-story.shtml

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.