Universal Tonality: The Life and Music of William Parker

Interview with Cisco Bradley

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This book is a model for jazz biography (and really for a biography of any creative person.) It not only documents the striving of an individual artist, in this case, William Parker, but also the dynamic communities that are essential for the development of artists.

I strongly recommend this book for music educators, music students, and anyone who wants to get “under the hood” of what goes into making an artist who succeeds in expanding the boundaries of the art.

Anyone interested in (or nostalgic for) the stunning flowering of creative music that took place in the 1970s when, believe it or not, rents in the East Village and Soho of Manhattan were low and musician-operated venues were abundant will also love this book.

You can order Universal Tonality: The Life and Music of William Parker here

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Music credit: The Jazz on the Tube podcast theme song is “Mambo Inferno” performed by The Manhattan School of Music Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra conducted by Bobby Sanabria from the CD ¡Que Viva Harlem!

Swingin’ the Blues – The Virtuosity of Eddie Durham

Information on how you can order the book


Remembering Eddie Durham with Topsy Durham

Recollections with Eddie’s daughter Topsy


Download the mp3 here

Information on how you can order the book

Jazz on the Tube is declaring 2020 the “Year of Eddie Durham.”

If you don’t know Eddie Durham (1906-1987), buckle your seat belts. He’s one the the secret sources of the music we call jazz.

Take Eddie out of the equation and a whole lot of things that made jazz jazz would never have happened.

He’s easily one of the most important musicians in the history of jazz and therefore one of the most important musicians in the history of American music.

Whose careers were nourished by Eddie Durham’s genius?

How about these for starters?

The Oklahoma City Blue Devils, Benny Moten, Jimmie Lunceford, Count Basie, Charlie Christian, Lester Young, Glenn Miller – and this is just the short list!

Click here to go to the Eddie Durham tribute site

Music referenced in this interview


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1. Moten’s Swing (1933) – (00:00)
2. Hittin’ the Bottle (1935) – (03:24)
3. Topsy (1937) – (06:24)
4. Good Morning Blues (1937) – (09:38)
5. Swinging the Blues (1938) – (12:26)
6. Countless Blues (1938) – (15:10)
7. Way Down Yonder in New Orleans (1938 – two takes) – (18:07)
8. Jumpin’ at the Woodside (1939) – (24:09)
9. In the Mood (1939) – (27:18)

Documentary about Eddie Durham by the Center for Texas Music History

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Music credit: The Jazz on the Tube podcast theme song is “Mambo Inferno” performed by The Manhattan School of Music Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra conducted by Bobby Sanabria from the CD ¡Que Viva Harlem!


The Annual San Marcos Texas, Eddie Durham Tribute Sponsored by the Calaboose African American History Museum

The secret creative “spark plug” behind the success of the Blue Devils, Jimmy Lunceford, Lester Young, Freddie Green, Charlie Christian and Count Basie. Arranger of Glen Miller’s “In the Mood” too!

Aurora Nealand A look at KindHumanKind

Interview with Aurora Nealand


Download the mp3 here

Follow Aurora here

auroranealand.com

facebook.com/aurora.nealand

auroranealand.bandcamp.com

louisianamusicfactory.com

The entire wide-ranging, free-wheeling conversation – unedited – complete with numerous sidebars, including some genealogical information which despite Aurora’s surprise may actually have a degree of accuracy (to be continued.)


Download the mp3 here

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Roger Lewis and the Good News from New Orleans

Interview with Roger Lewis


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Jazz on the Tube talks with Roger Lewis of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band.

We go into the evolution of brass bands and then dive deep into the living, breathing traditions of New Orleans music.

Click here for more info about The Dirty Dozen Brass Band

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Michael Lazaroff: Taking live-streaming to a new level

Interview with Michael Lazaroff


Download the mp3 here

For more information

First show:  George Benson
Saturday, October 10, 9 PM eastern
FREE!

Sign up here:

SaturdaynightwithMarcusMiller.com

More info about the Jazz Cruise here:
ThejazzCruise.com

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Music credit: The Jazz on the Tube podcast theme song is “Mambo Inferno” performed by The Manhattan School of Music Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra conducted by Bobby Sanabria from the CD ¡Que Viva Harlem!

Harlem of the West – The San Francisco Jazz Era

Interview with Elizabeth Pepin and Lewis Watts


Download the mp3 here

You can order Harlem of the West – The San Francisco Jazz Era here

The Fillmore played a big part in my life.

In 1967, as a seven year old I used to take my 5 year old brother to school and we changed buses at Fillmore and Geary. Public transit. Different times!

Later I lived on California and Fillmore from 1990 to 1998, a glorious time to live in San Francisco.

During that period, I built one of the world’s first online-only museums and it was dedicated to – of course – the history of Fillmore Street.

Every shred of Fillmore’s illustrious jazz history had been stripped away by that point, but bit by bit I reassembled what I could.

Then along came Elizabeth Pepin and Lewis Watts who began an ongoing multi-decade labor of love documenting one of America’s great African-American communities and what at the time was one of the hottest jazz scenes west of the Mississippi.

Their book – now in a brand new addition with 100 brand new pages of photos and text – is luscious.

You can’t understand the history of jazz without having a feel for the “scenes” that made jazz possible and this may be the best capture of a 1940s+ era jazz scene ever.

My fervent wish is that every “scene” find archivists, historians, and story tellers with the same passion and dedication as Pepin and Watts to capture their story while it’s still possible to talk with the people who lived it. This is not just important jazz history, it’s important American history.

A great book for every jazz lover.

You can order Harlem of the West – The San Francisco Jazz Era here

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Music credit: The Jazz on the Tube podcast theme song is “Mambo Inferno” performed by The Manhattan School of Music Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra conducted by Bobby Sanabria from the CD ¡Que Viva Harlem!

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