Vic Hobson and the roots of Louis Armstrong’s music

Interview with Vic Hobson


Download the mp3 here

Louis Armstrong was a genius – no doubt about that.

But there’s no such thing as a genius in a vacuum.

For some strange reason, the culture and community that gave birth to Louis Armstrong is given short shrift in accounts of his life and art.

In his autobiography and in interviews, Armstrong painted a vivid picture of the world he grew up in, but until now, there has been no in-depth inquiry into what he meant when he said things like “I figure singing and playing is the same,” or, “Singing was more into my blood than the trumpet.”

Now thanks to Vic Hobson’s book “Creating the Jazz Solo” we’re starting to understand what he meant.


Book: Creating the Jazz Solo: Louis Armstrong and Barbershop Harmony (American Made Music Series)


Click here to learn more about Vic Hobson’s work:


Comments and insights sought (scroll to the bottom of the page)

Comments and insights sought from musicians, music educators and scholars. We’re opening this up to a moderated discussion.

Our goal: To discover if there was something valuable and now lost in music education that can be productively revived.


Musical references:

The Hidden Roots of Jazz Harmony

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Interview with Dave Oliphant about Texan Jazz

Interview with Dave Oliphant


Download the mp3 here

The music at the end this interview is “I’m an Old Cow Hand” composed by Johnny Mercer and recorded by Fairfield,Texas-born (1924) Kenny Durham on January 10, 1960. For a unique “discography” of Durham’s work, see Oliphant’s biography-poem KD: A Jazz Biography


Books by Dave Oliphant

Book: Texan Jazz


Book: Jazz Mavericks of the Lone State State


Book: KD: A Jazz Biography


Documentary about Dave Oliphant by Kanya Lyons

A documentary short about Native Texas Poet Dave Oliphant. This documentary was filmed, edited, produced and directed by Kanya Lyons in 2018.

Oliphant was born in Fort Worth in 1939. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees in English from Lamar University and the University of Texas, respectively, and his Ph.D. from Northern Illinois University. His primary reading and writing interest has always been poetry, but he has also written four books on jazz (primarily by Texas musicians).

He has translated poetry from Spanish and was a winner of the Texas Institute of Letters book translation award in 2011. In addition to fourteen collections of his own poetry, among them The Pilgrimage: Selected Poems 1962-2012, he has edited three anthologies of Texas poetry and one of Chilean poetry. For forty years he contributed essays on and reviews of Texas poetry to various state literary magazines, and 55 of those pieces were collected in 2015 in his Generations of Texas Poets.

He retired from the University of Texas at Austin after serving for 30 years in various capacities, from assistant professor to editor of a scholarly journal, senior lecturer, and coordinator of the Freshman Seminars Program. He lives in Cedar Park, Texas with his wife and muse, Maria.


Click hear to listen to Dave Oliphant reading his poetry


– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

Music credits:

The Jazz on the Tube podcast theme song is “Mambo Inferno” performed by The Manhattan School of Music Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra conducted by Bobby Sanabria from the CD ¡Que Viva Harlem!

At the end of today’s interview, we featured “I’m an Old Cow Hand”, written by Johnny Mercer and performed by Kenny Dorham (Xanadu Records, The Kenny Dorham Memorial Album) recorded January 10, 1960 (4:12)

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

12 Street Rag – The evolution of jazz in a single tune

Inspired by Chapter One (pgs. 28-34) of Texan Jazz by Dave Oliphant

Composer Euday Bowman (1915)
Born November 9, 1887, Fort Worth, Texas

Louis Armstrong – Recorded 1927

Benny Moten & His Kansas City Orchestra – Recorded 1927

Duke Ellington – 1931

Fats Waller – Recorded 1935

Count Basie with Lester Young – Recorded 1939

Andy Kirk featuring Mary Lou Williams (piano and arranger) – Recorded 1940

Sidney Bechet – Recorded 1941

This page inspired by Chapter One (pgs. 28-34) of Texan Jazz by Dave Oliphant

– Ken McCarthy

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Interview with Gilberto Valdés Zequeira – in his 90th year

Jazz on the Tube brought Gilberto (left) and his friend
David Amram together again in Havana after a 40 year absence

Interview with Gilberto Valdés Zequeira


Download the mp3 here

Gilberto Valdés Zequeira was born in Havana on August 16, 1928.

As a kid he listened to Chano Pozo’s rehearsals in the Colon neighborhood of Havana.

His vocal group had a weekly gig at the San Souci night club in Havana and he appeared on Cuba’s pioneering television channel twice a week in the 1950s.

Roy Haynes introduced him to American jazz drumming and gave him his first set of drumsticks.

He performed with his old friend Bebo Valdés when the two of them found themselves in Europe in the early 1960s.

He spent time as the #2 man at Egrem.

He was Dizzy Gillespie’s host when Dizzy visited Havana in 1977.

He introduced Irakere to Columbia Records and toured the world with them as their manager.

He helped save Cuba’s most important jazz club La Zorra y el Cuervo from being turned into a pizzeria.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg of Gilberto’s remarkable life.

Click here to learn more about Gilberto.

Havana’s top nightclub Sans Souci (1958)

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

P.S. Our unique programming is made possible by help from people like you. Learn how you can contribute to our efforts here: Support Jazz on the Tube
Thanks.

Go to Cuba with Jazz on the Tube as your guide:
Click here for details

Ronnie Burrage: Drummer, bandleader, producer, historian, educator, activist

Interview with Ronnie Burrage


Download the mp3 here

Who do call when you need a rock solid drummer?

Sonny Rollins, McCoy Tyner, Jackie McLean, Woody Shaw, Freddie Hubbard, Sonny Fortune, Doc Cheatham, Sir Rolland Hanna, Michael Brecker, Wayne Shorter, Jaco Pastorius, Chico Freeman, Hamiet Bluiett, and many others have all agreed: Ronnie Burrage.

In this call, we talk about Ronnie’s fascinating family, his career as a top go-to jazz drummer, and his inspiring work using music to serve the community.

Ronnie’s latest project is bringing young people to elder homes so they can enjoy music and talk about it – and life – together. Robbie calls it “gen-to-gen”, generation-to-generation, and we get into why it’s so important on the call.

You can support Ronnie’s community work by voting for his project.

You have to open an account to vote. After, you open the account you’ll be given choices to vote for. Vote for the World Rhythm Academy.

Yes, the process is a pain, but it’s worth doing.

Remember: The rules allow you to vote every day, once a day for the duration of the contest.

Vote for the World Rhythm Academy


Click here for info about Ronnie’s World Rhythm Academy


The Ronnie Burrage Trio featuring Archie Shepp: “Straight No Chaser.”


You have to open an account to vote. After, you open the account you’ll be given choices to vote for. Vote for the World Rhythm Academy.

Yes, the process is a pain, but it’s worth doing.

Remember: The rules allow you to vote every day, once a day

Vote for the World Rhythm Academy: https://encore.givkwik.com/account


You can contact Ronnie’s manager here

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

Music credit: The Jazz on the Tube podcast theme song is “Mambo Inferno” performed by The Manhattan School of Music Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra conducted by Bobby Sanabria from the CD ¡Que Viva Harlem!

Judy Carmichael – Jazz Inspired – Part Two

Interview with Judy Carmichael


Download the mp3 here

Part Two of our conversation with Judy Carmichael

Pianist, singer, song writer, author, producer – and host of the best jazz interview show on the radio (and the Internet): Jazz Inspired. Click here for more info about Judy Click here to listen to Judy’s Jazz Inspired interview with Alan Broadbent

– Ken McCarthy
Jazz on the Tube

Music credit: The Jazz on the Tube podcast theme song is “Mambo Inferno” performed by The Manhattan School of Music Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra conducted by Bobby Sanabria from the CD ¡Que Viva Harlem!